Jan 152014
 

Tucker implores state to run Union County DSS until it is ‘on solid footing’

By David Perlmutt
dperlmutt@charlotteobserver.com

Posted: Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2014

A visibly angry N.C. Sen. Tommy Tucker implored state health officials Tuesday to temporarily intervene in the “day-to-day operations” of Union County’s social services department after a shocking child abuse case that involved one of the agency’s own.

Tucker told state DSS Director Wayne Black at a legislative hearing that his office needs “to dive in” to the county agency while authorities investigate the handcuffing of an 11-year-old boy to the porch of his guardian’s Monroe-area home – with a dead chicken around his neck. Wanda Larson, a county child protective services supervisor who apparently is the boy’s legal guardian, and her longtime boyfriend were arrested in November and indicted a month later on child abuse charges.

Authorities removed the boy and four other adopted children, ages 7 to 14, from the home and placed them in the charge of Davidson County DSS. Larson also was fired by the county.

Tucker, a Waxhaw Republican who represents Union County, was incredulous after Black told a joint committee of lawmakers that his office doesn’t have the authority to intervene in Union County. Black said the county Human Services Department director requested the state investigate its operations, identify any deficiencies and make recommendations. DSS is part of the Human Services Department.

By law, Black said the state could only take over if Union’s human services and DSS directors weren’t cooperative, and they found children in danger.

But Tucker argued that DSS has had considerable changeover in leadership in the past three years and that Union County commissioners dissolved an advisory board to the Human Services Department.

“I don’t know what urgency it takes that the state doesn’t need to dive in and run that agency day to day,” he told Black during the Raleigh hearing. “The board’s been dissolved and you’ve got county commissioners that do not know the system … now taking charge. You’re leaving the county … to police itself and you’re going to take a hands-off approach because there is no state statute?

“Forgive me, sir, this is unbelievable; it’s unconscionable that this could happen.”

Commissioners chairman Frank Aikmus declined to comment.

via Tucker implores state to run Union County DSS until it is ‘on solid footing’ | CharlotteObserver.com.


 

Oct 182013
 

Yesterday, the County Commissioners laid out their reasons for appealing the verdict.

From County Commissioner Press Release: “We cannot allow a verdict that would destroy our schools, bankrupt our businesses, and squeeze every single taxpayer in our county to go unchallenged,” said Union County Board of Commissioners Chairman Jerry Simpson. “This decision would devastate businesses, seniors, taxpayers and children.”

“We are not going to sit by and have 12 jurors determine the future of our county,” Simpson said. “If taxpayers want to spend that kind of money and deal with the consequences of that kind of spending, then all the voters of Union County should decide to go down that path. This decision would harm our businesses, our schools, our families to the core.”

EJ: County appeals school funding verdict

Now, is anyone really surprised at the County filing an appeal? Whats the old saying “In for a penny, In for a pound” fit the reasoning or is “OPM: Other Peoples Money” more apropos. For a group of mind-synced politicians who constantly profess to be good stewards of taxpayer money or pound the table of conservative values, they are very liberal in spending money on lawyers, audits and “Needs” studies that they just ignore when result is opposite of what their mindset expected.

I suppose what really irks me more than anything else is the histrionics and fear-mongering they continue to do in every communique to the public. They sound like, forgive me, Barrack Obama during sequestration last year.

All you had to say was “We are going to appeal”, that was it! No more pointless posturing, we know the dance ~~ KABUKI ON, Garth.

aragoto

Kabuki(sml)

Jerry Simpson: pictured in a white, Cindy Coto and Jonathan Thomas.
(Click the photo to enlarge)

 

 

 


KABUKI DANCE
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Kabuki is a term used by American political pundits as a synonym for political posturing. It acquired this derogatory meaning after drawn out peace-time treaty negotiations between the United States and Japan which had extended to 1960, and because Japan, in an effort “to shed its image as a global marauder” sent Kabuki theater tours to the U.S. after World War II to sow the seeds of goodwill.

Aug 122013
 

Acrimonious Union County budget fight heads to court Monday

By Adam Bell
abell@charlotteobserver.com
Posted: Saturday, Aug. 10, 2013

The acrimonious budget fight between Union County commissioners and the school board is heading to court this week.

The trial begins Monday in Union County Superior Court, and could last a week or two.

The school board claims that commissioners did not adequately fund the school district for the current school year. The county insists it provided enough money, and that any additional money going to the board would result in tax hikes or service cuts.

In its lawsuit, the school board is seeking a judgment that may authorize commissioners to raise taxes “as may be necessary” to cover money awarded to the district.

The district also wants a jury to determine the amount of money “legally necessary from all sources” to maintain the school system. Such sources could include state or federal funds or proceeds from the state lottery or sales tax, said Richard Schwartz, a Raleigh attorney who represents the district.

In June, the school board had sought mediation after county commissioners approved their $298 million operating and capital budget for 2013-14. The budget included $82.3 million in general operating funds for the school district, or about $2.7 million less than the district wanted but a nearly 2 percent increase over the previous year.

The district also sought $8.4 million in capital funds; the county approved $9 million over three years.

In mediation, the school district proposed a settlement to get an additional $1.9 million over a three-year period for operating expenses, and another $26 million in capital funds during that time, on top of the funding it already was set to receive, the county said. Such a plan would create a $38.5 million deficit over three years, the county said, and require a whopping 10 percent tax increase.

The county disclosed the district’s plan after they reached an impasse in mediation, and included it in a press released with the headline: “Union County Public Schools Failed to Resolve Budget Dispute.”

At the time, the county also said the district had a projected surplus of $2.9 million when factoring in the county’s funding, the school district’s fund balance, adjustments for school board budget requests that appeared to be inflated, and increases in state funding that were finalized after mediation began.

The district’s press release after mediation ended blamed the county’s “failure of leadership” for publicly attacking the school system.

Schwartz called the $2.9 million figure “wildly inaccurate. They don’t understand the state budgeting process.” And he said the county’s description of the settlement offer was completely inaccurate.

Judge Erwin Spainhour, senior resident superior court judge in Cabarrus County, is expected to preside over the case.

As part of its lawsuit, the school district wants the county to cover the district’s legal fees, which Schwartz said was a standard request in such cases. Union County will be represented by county attorney Ligon Bundy and another lawyer in his office, Chris Cox.

The losing side has the option of going to the N.C. Court of Appeals.

The current state law dealing with school district funding disputes was enacted in 1997 and since then, no district has sought mediation more than Union’s. The district has sought mediation four times now.

Each of the other three times, in 1998, 2003 and 2007, the two sides settled the case before going to court although the 2007 deal resulted in a tax increase to cover increases in the district’s budget. It added nearly 3 cents to the tax rate, or nearly an extra $60 in taxes for someone with a $200,000 home.

via Acrimonious Union County budget fight heads to court Monday | CharlotteObserver.com.